Eastbourne borough area profile

Introduction

This profile should be used to inform decisions and plans and to identify priorities to improve local people’s health and reduce health inequalities in Eastbourne.

The profile identifies needs (which may also be referred to or seen as deficits) as well as assets (which may also be referred to or seen as strengths) from key indicators that have been bench marked against the England average.

Causes of premature mortality and inequalities in life expectancy are also presented.

This profile forms part of the East Sussex Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA) and draws together data and analysis from East Sussex public health reports and various health profiles produced by Public Health England. It brings together existing data and analysis, from a variety of sources, at Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), Primary Care Networks (PCNs), district/borough councils and East Sussex levels.


Understanding the data

The geographies

This profile contains data for Eastbourne borough. Most charts, tables and maps present data at both upper tier and lower tier local authority geographies. However, some datasets are only available at other geographies (for example some of the primary care datasets are only available by NHS geographies) and so this information will be presented by those geographies.

Significance testing

Where possible, data has been benchmarked and compared against England, or in some cases specific targets. Where differences are observed and found to be significant, then this will refer to statistical significance at the 95% confidence level. However, it is important to bear in mind that:

  • where values are based on high counts, even small, possibly unimportant, differences may be statistically significant, and
  • where values are based on low counts, even large, possibly important differences may not be statistically significant.

Rates

Where rates are used, some rates may not be age standardised. If crude rates are reported and the condition mainly affects older people, it is important to also take into account the age profile of the population. Where age standardised rates are presented, then this will be noted in the title of the chart/table.


The borough

The geography of Eastbourne

Eastbourne is located on the south east coast of England and is in the county of East Sussex. It is a one of five lower tier local authorities (Eastbourne Borough Council, Hastings Borough Council, Lewes District Council, Rother District Council and Wealden District Council). East Sussex County Council is the upper tier local authority. Eastbourne has a population of approximately 103,000 residents.

Eastbourne borough is situated on the coast with its land border surrounded by Wealden district. The most populated areas are the central coastal area, Hampden Park to the north and Langney in the north east of the borough.

Map 1 shows the borough of Eastbourne and details the key areas of the town and major roads.

Map 1 Eastbourne showing the key areas of the town and major roads

Map 1 Eastbourne showing the key areas of the town and major roads

Rural & urban

Within Eastbourne there are 61 Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs).

Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs) are small areas designed to be of a similar population size, with an average of approximately 1,500 residents or 650 households in each LSOA. They were produced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) for the reporting of small area statistics.

The ONS have classified all LSOAs as either Urban, Rural or Fringe. All Eastbourne’s LSOAs are classified as Urban city and town. Map 2 shows the distribution of the rural and urban areas across the whole county, including Eastbourne.

Map 2 Urban and rural classification of each LSOA in East Sussex, 2011

Map 2 Urban and rural classification of each LSOA in East Sussex, 2011
  • Chart 1 shows that all of the LSOAs in Eastbourne and Hasting are urban. The other districts within the county have a mixture of rural and urban towns and villages, with Rother having over 50% of its towns and villages classified as rural or fringe.

Chart 1 The population who live in urban or rural areas for each district/borough in East Sussex,2011

Health and care sites

Within Eastbourne the health and care infrastructure across the borough includes:

  • 1 acute hospital (Eastbourne District General Hospital) and 5 community hospitals
  • 8 GP practices, 3 Branch practices
  • 20 community pharmacies
  • 65 care homes
  • 4 independent schools, 29 maintained schools and 1 college

We have developed an online mapping tool using Tableau which will allow you to select different geographies and health and care settings to create bespoke maps. To access this mapping tool go to the East Sussex Health and Care Tableau Mapping Tool to look at these maps in more detail.

Tableau is a data visualisation tool. For more information about Tableau visit Visualise public data | Explore, learn, share | Tableau Public.

Map 3 An example of the East Sussex Health and Care Tableau Mapping Tool highlighting where the hospitals and pharmacies are across the county

East Sussex Health and Care Tableau Mapping Tool

Map 4 Primary care networks in East Sussex, 2023

Map 4 Primary care networks in East Sussex, 2022

There are 12 Primary Care Networks (PCNs) in East Sussex covering a registered population size of 566,900 (April, 2023). PCNs are groups of GP practices which work together with community, mental health, social care, pharmacy, hospital and voluntary services in their local area. In each PCN there are usually approximately 30,000 to 50,000 patients.

There are no strict geographical boundaries for PCNs as their reach and coverage is based on where each GP’s registered population live. Some patients who live geographically next door to one another may be registered with different GP practices, which in turn may be part of different PCNs, and so there is no obvious geographical border.

However, to show a PCN on a map we have carried out a mapping exercise to try to highlight the geographical areas which contain the majority of patients for each PCN. Map 4 shows the areas where the majority of each PCN’s registered patients live. The different colours on the map represent the different PCN areas. Note that certain PCNs (e.g. ALPS Group) are represented by 2 separate areas on the map. Some areas in East Sussex (mainly on the boarders of the county) show PCNs from outside of East Sussex. This is because the majority of East Sussex residents in those areas are registered with non-East Sussex GP practices, and so belong to non-East Sussex PCNs.

There are 3 PCN footprints that include parts of Eastbourne borough. One PCN (ALPS Group) has its footprint fully within the Eastbourne boundary. 2 PCNs (Victoria Eastbourne and Eastbourne East) have footprints that are also part of other East Sussex district and boroughs.

In this area profile, there are tables which show data for all the PCNs within East Sussex (Table 8, Table 16). However, for this Eastbourne borough area profile, any commentary about PCN data will refer to ALPS Group, Victoria Eastbourne and Eastbourne East PCNs.


Population demographics

Deprivation

  • The most deprived areas in Eastbourne are mainly in the Hampden Park, Langney area, the north east part of the town centre and Roselands area.
  • Table 1 shows the most deprived quintile has the highest percentage of people aged under 65, and the lowest percentage aged over 65, compared to the other quintiles.

Map 5 Areas of deprivation in Eastbourne showing the LSOAs ranking according to their deprivation quintile, 2019

Map 5 Areas of deprivation in Eastbourne showing the LSOAs ranking according to their deprivation quintile, 2019
Table 1 Eastbourne age profile for deprivation quintiles, 2020
National IMD Quintile 0-4 5-19 20-64 65+
1 = most deprived 20% areas in England 6% 19% 60% 15%
2 5% 17% 55% 22%
3 4% 14% 50% 32%
4 4% 15% 50% 31%
5 = least deprived 20% areas in England 4% 18% 48% 30%

Age structure

  • Eastbourne has an older population structure compared to England, especially in those aged 70 years and over.
  • Eastbourne also has a lower percentage for younger age ranges especially those aged 25 to 34 year olds (both males and females) than England.

Chart 2 Eastbourne borough’s population profile (total population 101,681), 2021

Population pyramid showing each of the 5 year age bands for both males and females in Eastbourne compared to East Sussex.

Population for different age groups

  • Map 6 shows the highest percentage of children aged 0-4 are mainly in the Hampden Park, Langney, parts of Old Town, St Anthony and Roselands areas of the town.

Map 6 The percentage of children aged 0 to 4 in Eastbourne borough’s LSOAs, 2021

Map of Eastbourne showing which LSOAs have the highest % of children aged 0-4

  • Hampden Park area, Langney, St Anthony's and Old Town has the highest percentage of people aged 5 to 19 (Map 7).

Map 7 The percentage of people aged 5 to 19 in Eastbourne borough’s LSOAs, 2021

A Map of Eastbourne showing which LSOAs have the highest % of people aged 5 to 19

  • The highest percentages of working age people (Map 8) live in the centre of Eastbourne running through the town centre, Roseland area, St Anthony’s and the East of Hampden Park.

Map 8 The percentage of people aged 20 to 64 in Eastbourne borough’s LSOAs, 2021

Map of Eastbourne showing which LSOAs have the highest % of people aged 20 to 64

  • The highest percentages of people aged 65+ live in the south west of Eastbourne, Willingdon area and in the far east of Eastbourne.

Map 9 The percentage of people aged 65+ in Eastbourne borough’s LSOAs, 2021

Map of Eastbourne showing which LSOAs have the highest % of people aged 65+

Ethnicity

  • Data from the 2021 census shows that Eastbourne has a higher percentage (approximately, 82%) of White British and Northern Irish compared to England (approximately, 74%). Other white (7.7%) is by far the largest Ethnic group other than White British or Norther Irish, higher than East Sussex (4.6%) and England (6.5%).

  • Chart 3 shows a comparison of all other ethnicities in Eastbourne compared to England and East Sussex.

Chart 3 Ethnic groups other than White British or Northern Irish, 2021

Chart 4 Ethnicity and broad age group in Eastbourne, 2021

Birth rate

  • There has been a general decline in the live birth rate in East Sussex over the past 5 years (Chart 5), similar to what has been observed in England.

  • Eastbourne birth rates (all ages) has fallen over the period 2014-2020 there was a slight increase in 2020 compared to the previous year. The birth rate in Eastbourne in now lower than England but higher than East Sussex.

Chart 5 Live birth rate (per 1,000 women in the age group) - all ages, 2014- 20

Live birth rate (per 1,000 women in the age group).

  • Table 2 shows for Eastbourne that for women for age groups 20 and above birth rates were higher than England.
Table 2 Live Birth rate (per 1,000 women in the age group), 2020
Location Under 20 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40 & Over all ages
England 10 45 85 103 60 16 55
East Sussex 10 50 92 104 56 13 53
Eastbourne 15 54 101 107 47 12 54
Hastings 17 68 94 99 50 15 59
Lewes 7 39 88 102 63 13 51
Rother  7 52 90 96 63 15 53
Wealden 6 39 90 110 57 13 51

Population change

  • There is projected to be 1,300 more people living in Eastbourne in 2026 compared to 2022 which is a 1% increase.
  • The highest increase projected will be for people aged 65-84 with some 1,900 (8%).

Wider determinants of health

Housing

  • Eastbourne has the second lowest percentage of owner occupied housing (60%) and the second highest percentage of private rented housing (27%) compared to East Sussex.

Chart 6 Dwelling stock by tenure, 2021

  • Chart 7 shows that within East Sussex, Eastbourne had the highest rates of overcrowding in social rented housing (19%) and in private rented or living rented free (14%).

Chart 7 Overcrowded households in East Sussex by tenure, 2021

Income

  • Eastbourne average (median) full time earnings are the third lowest in East Sussex and below the average (median) full time in England.

Chart 8 Resident-based average (median) full time and part time earnings, 2022

Please note: the data for part-time workers for Eastbourne, Lewes, Rother, and Wealden was unavailable for 2022 so 2021 data was used.

Employment

Eastbourne has the second lowest percentage of working age people in employment (74.5%).

Chart 9 Working age (16-64) people in employment, 2020

Education

  • Qualification levels in general are broadly in line with East Sussex. However, Eastbourne has the lowest percentage of Level 4 qualifications (30%) compared to the other East Sussex districts and boroughs.  

Chart 10 Qualifications of working age population, 2021

Source: ONS Nomis Annual Population Survey: Qualifications of working age population, 2020. Note the data for no qualifications for Lewes district was unavailable for 2020 so 2019 data were used.

The data shown in Chart 10 shows the percentage of people who have “up to” a specific qualification level. For example, 10% of people in England are qualified up to level 1 only, 17% are qualified up to level 2 only, 19 % are qualified up to level 3 only, etc.

The different levels of qualifications are defined as:

  • Level 1: 1+ O level passes, 1+ CSE/GCSE any grades, NVQ level 1, Foundation GNVQ.
  • Level 2: 5+ O level passes, 5+ CSEs (grade 1's), 5+ GCSEs (grades A-C), School Certificate, 1+ A levels/AS levels, NVQ level 2, Intermediate GNVQ.
  • Level 3: 2+ A levels, 4+ AS levels, Higher School Certificate, NVQ level 3, Advanced GNVQ, ONC, OND, BTEC National etc.
  • Level 4 and above: First degree, Higher degree, NVQ levels 4 and 5, HNC, HND, Professional qualifications (for example teaching, nursing, accountancy).
  • Other qualifications: Vocational/Work-related Qualifications, Foreign Qualifications, includes any qualifications not mentioned above.

Crime

  • Eastbourne has similar rates of total crime (excluding fraud) and violence against the person compared to England but higher rates than East Sussex.

Chart 11 Total recorded crime and violence against the person, 2022

Loneliness & isolation

  • Those who answered the survey question saying they ‘often or some of the time felt lonely living in your local area’ were slightly higher in Eastbourne compared to East Sussex.
  • The response to this question across all areas when looking at how people answered the survey in previous years is broadly the same with no discernible trend.

Chart 12 Community Survey – Responses to the question “do you ever feel lonely living in your local area?", 2015 - 2019

Environment

  • Domestic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions were the largest of the three sectors in 2005 but these emissions have fallen by 41% in 2020.

  • The industrial and commercial sector emissions have continued to fall with a 58% decrease in 2020 compared to 2005.

  • The transport sector of CO2 emissions has had a reduction over the period with a decline of 29% which is the least compared to the other sectors.

Chart 13 CO2 Emissions by sector 2005 - 2020 in East Sussex

  • The reduction of CO2 has been consistent across all districts and boroughs through the years 2005-2020 with a 50% reduction for East Sussex.
  • In 2005 Eastbourne had 5.2 per capita emissions but by 2020 it has reduced to 2.5 per capita emissions a (46%) reduction.

Chart 14 Emissions of carbon dioxide per person in East Sussex by district and borough, 2005-2020

Access to healthy spaces

Natural England have produced an online map that shows where all the green spaces are within the UK. To access the tool go to Natural England’s Green Infrastructure Map. The mapping tool provides many different layers that can be selected in order to provide a map view of resources of the local area.

Map 10 shows the green and blue spaces in East Sussex, produced using the mapping tool.

Map 10 An extract from Natural England’s mapping tool showing some of the green & blue infrastructure areas in East Sussex

Blue spaces are outdoor environments, either natural or built, that prominently feature water such as streams, ponds, canals and other water bodies.


Life expectancy

Life expectancy

  • Life Expectancy (LE) at birth is higher at an East Sussex level compared to England and higher for females than males. LE was increasing in East Sussex up to around 2012-2014 when it began to plateau. The latest data (2018-2020) estimates that life expectancy for females in East Sussex is 84.1 years and for males 80.1 years.
  • At a lower tier level, for males, Eastbourne has lower LE compared to East Sussex. This has been the case for most of the period shown in chart 16. The LE in Eastbourne has increased over the period from 75.7 years (2001-2003) to 78.9 years (2018-2020). For females, Eastbourne has similar LE compared to East Sussex increased over the period from 82.0 years (2001-2003) to 83.6 years (2018-2020)
  • At a small area level (MSOA, latest data 2015-2019) in Eastbourne for males it is lowest in Pier (73.7 years) which is the lowest in East Sussex. The highest is found in Sovereign Harbour (82.6 years). For females in Eastbourne the lowest is in Pier (81.4 years) the highest is found in Sovereign Harbour (87.4 years).

Chart 15 Life expectancy between 2001 to 2003 and 2018 to 2020, East Sussex and England

Please note ‘years’ axis does not start at zero

Chart 16 Life expectancy for males: between 2001 to 2003 and 2018 to 2020 by district and borough

Please note ‘years’ axis does not start at zero

Chart 17 Life expectancy for females: between 2001 to 2003 and 2018 to 2020 by district and borough

Middle Layer Super Output Areas (MSOAs) are a geographic hierarchy designed to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales. MSOAs are built from groups of LSOAs. In East Sussex there are 69 MSOAs, each containing on average 8,000 residents.

Map 11 Life expectancy for males, MSOAs 2015-2019

Map showing Life expectancy for males, MSOAs 2015-2019

Map 12 Life expectancy for females, MSOAs 2015-2019

Map of East Sussex showing Life expectancy for females, MSOAs 2015-2019

Gap in life expectancy

  • Respiratory conditions contribute the most to the gap in LE between the most and least deprived areas in Eastbourne for both males and females (28.7 and 37.9%). This is followed by cancer and then circulatory conditions, with these 3 disease groups together contributing to over 70% of the gap for males females.

Chart 18 Breakdown of the LE gap (within area) between most and least deprived areas in Eastbourne, 2017-2019

Healthy life expectancy

  • In the latest time period (2018-2020) healthy life expectancy for males (63.1 years) is the same as for England. However, for females in East Sussex (63.3) it is lower than nationally (63.9) but has increased from a drop in 2017-19 which was the lowest it had been in the last 10 years.

Chart 19 Healthy Life Expectancy at birth, East Sussex and England, between 2009 to 2011 and 2018 to 2020

Please note ‘years’ axis does not start at zero

Leading causes of death

  • Across all ages dementia is the leading cause of death in Eastbourne followed by ischaemic heart diseases.
  • From a premature mortality perspective (deaths in under 75s), the leading cause of death is ischaemic heart disease, followed by stroke. 

Table 5 All ages, leading cause of death (numbers of deaths shown, with cancers broken down), 2022

Table 6 Under 75s, leading cause of death (numbers of deaths shown, with cancers broken down), 2022

Premature mortality (deaths under 75s)

  • Eastbourne has the second highest premature mortality.
  • Premature mortality is highest in Hastings and Lowest in Wealden. All areas had a decrease in premature mortality in 2022 compared to the previous year.

  • Premature mortality is highest in the most deprived quintile.

  • All quintiles saw a reduction in premature mortality in 2022 compared to the previous year. For quintiles 1, 2 and 4 this decrease was significantly different from the previous year.

Chart 20 Premature mortality (under 75s) from all causes, by district and borough, 2019 – 2022

Chart 20 Premature mortality (under 75s) from all causes, by district and borough, 2019 – 2021

Chart 21 Premature mortality (under 75s) from all causes, rates by national deprivation quintile, 2019 - 2022

Chart 21 Premature mortality (under 75s) from all causes, rates by national deprivation quintile, 2019 - 2021


Disease & poor health

Disability

  • In the 2011 Census Eastbourne had 20,831 people with a Limited long-term illness. This is projected to increase to 26,839 an increase of 29% by 2034.
  • The projected overall disability in 2019 was 18,579. This is projected to increase to 22,289 an increase of 20%.
  • The second highest number of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP) is in Eastbourne.

Please note: Disability living allowance (DLA) & Personal Independence Payments (PIP) - all claimants, May 2021.

Table 7 Data on disability for 2020 and the projected numbers for 2035
Illness / Disability East Sussex Eastbourne Hastings Lewes Rother  Wealden
Limited Long-Term illness - 2021 110,553 21,919 20,525 20,342 20,138 27,629
Projected LLTI - 2020 118,510 22,906 21,434 21,084 22,481 30,604
Projected LLTI - 2035 147,795 27,019 25,048 26,073 28,057 41,598
Projected overall disability - 2020 96,597 18,697 17,398 17,184 18,436 24,881
Projected overall disability - 2035 122,427 22,462 20,698 21,578 23,360 34,330
Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP) (All claimants, August 2022) 35,227 7,682 8,213 6,122 6,020 7,196

Source: East Sussex in Figures. Limited Long-Term illness – 2011 ; Projected LLTI ; Projected overall disability ; Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Personal Independence Payments (PIP)

Quality & outcomes framework

Table 8 shows extracts from the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) for 2022, 2023. 

Data within the QOF is not aged standardised and so some areas of high or low prevalence may in some part be a result of the age demographics of the area. It is important to understand more about the demography when interpreting this data. Public Health England have produced some National General Practice area profiles for PCNs, which include a “Data View” of the population.

This data can be access via PHEs National General Practice Profiles online Fingertips tool

Table 8 GP reported disease prevalence for each Primary Care Network in East Sussex, 2022, 2023

Table 8 GP reported disease prevalence for each Primary Care Network in East Sussex, 2019/20

View table 8 as a larger table pdf 106kb

To see what geographical footprints the Primary Care Networks cover see Map 4 in the “Primary Care Network” section of this document.

Obesity

  • Eastbourne has a significantly better percentage of children with excess weight age 10-11 years compared to England.
  • Eastbourne has a similar percentage of reception children with excess weight compared to England.
  • Eastbourne has similar percentage of overweight or obese adults compared to England.

Table 9 Excess weight and obesity in young people and adults, 2019 - 2022

Table 9 Excess weight and obesity in young people and adults, 2017 - 2020


Health related behaviours

Smoking

  • Eastbourne has similar smoking prevalence comapred to England. 

Table 11 Smoking prevalence and quit rates, 2019 - 2021

Table 11 Smoking prevalence and quit rates, 2019 - 2021

Alcohol

  • Eastbourne has significantly worse alcohol related admissions compared to England. 
  • Eastbourne has similar alcohol-specific mortality compared to England.

Table 12 Alcohol, 2017 - 2022

Table 12 Alcohol, 2017 - 2020

Physical activity & healthy eating

  • Eastbourne is significantly better for the proportion of the population meeting their recommended “5 a day”, compared to England.
  • Eastbourne has similar rates to England for physically active and inactive adults and the proportion of adults walking and cycling for travel at least 3 days per week.

Table 13 Physical activity and healthy eating, 2019 - 2022

Table 13 Physical activity and healthy eating, 2019 - 2021

No Data: Value missing due to small sample size

Sexual health

  • Compared to England, Eastbourne has a significantly better new STI diagnoses (which exclude chlamydia in under 25 year olds).

  • Compared to England, the chlamydia detection rates in people aged 15 to 24 years is similar in Eastbourne.

  • Compared to a target goal, Eastbourne has a similar HIV diagnosis prevalence rate per 1,000.

Table 14 Sexual health, 2020 - 2022

Table 14 Sexual health, 2020

Drug & Alcohol treatment

  • Eastbourne has significantly higher rates of adults in drug and/or alcohol treatment and for young people in drug or alcohol treatment.

Table 15 Drug and alcohol treatment, 2020 - 2022

Screening & immunisation

  • Data for childhood immunisation is only presented at East Sussex County level. For all childhood immunisations East Sussex is below the 95% goal for vaccination and significantly below the goal for DTap and IPV booster in 5 year olds.

  • A significantly higher percentage of 65+ year olds received their seasonal flu vaccination in East Sussex compared to the 75% goal for vaccination cover.

Table 16a Immunisations, 2019 - 2022

Table 16 Screening and immunisations, 2019 - 2021

Table 16b Screening , 2021 - 2022

Table 16 Screening and immunisations, 2019 - 2021

View table 16b as a larger table

  • The ALPs group and Eastbourne East PCN have a significantly better percentage of eligible 25-49 year olds screened for cervical cancer compared to England. Victoria Eastbourne PCN has a similar percentage compared to England.
  • Victoria Eastbourne PCN has a significantly lower eligible 50-70 year olds screened for breast cancer compared to England. However, Eastbourne East has a significantly higher percentage compared to England.

Health & social care services

Maternity

  • Eastbourne has a similar percentage of mothers breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks and deliveries to teenage mothers compared to England compared to England.

Table 17 Pregnancy and birth, 2017 - 2021

Table 17 Pregnancy and birth, 2017 - 2021

Hospital attendance

  • As the main provider of acute services in East Sussex, East Sussex Healthcare Trust (ESHT) provide at least half of all emergency and elective admissions, A&E and outpatient attendances for East Sussex residents. They are the main provider of services to residents in Eastbourne. There are a smaller but important percentage of Eastbourne residents who have elective admissions and first outpatient attendances provided elsewhere.
Table 18 Emergency admissions by hospital Trust admitted to, 2022/23
NHS Trust East Sussex Eastbourne Hastings Lewes Rother Wealden
East Sussex Healthcare Trust 70% 93% 94% 26% 87% 52%
University Hospitals Sussex  15% 3% 2% 69% 2% 13%
Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells 10% 0% 1% 0% 7% 29%
Elsewhere 4% 4% 3% 4% 4% 6%
 Percent Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Table 19 Elective admissions by hospital Trust admitted to, 2022/23
NHS Trust East Sussex Eastbourne Hastings Lewes Rother Wealden
East Sussex Healthcare Trust 59% 82% 84% 20% 79% 46%
University Hospitals Sussex  19% 6% 5% 63% 4% 14%
Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells 5% 0% 0% 0% 4% 15%
Elsewhere 17% 12% 11% 17% 13% 24%
 Percent total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Table 20 First outpatient attendances, 2022/23
NHS Trust East Sussex Eastbourne Hastings Lewes Rother Wealden
East Sussex Healthcare Trust 60% 82% 89% 20% 82% 44%
University Hospitals Sussex  16% 4% 3% 61% 3% 10%
Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells 8% 0% 0% 0% 5% 22%
Elsewhere 16% 14% 8% 19% 10% 23%
 Percent total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
Table 21 A&E attendances, 2022/23
NHS Trust East Sussex Eastbourne Hastings Lewes Rother Wealden
East Sussex Healthcare Trust 61% 94% 96% 14% 87% 40%
University Hospitals Sussex  15% 2% 1% 52% 1% 11%
Sussex Community Foundation Trust 15% 1% 0% 31% 2% 28%
Elsewhere 9% 2% 2% 2% 9% 21%
 Percent total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Hospital activity

  • Compared to the other East Sussex district and boroughs, Eastbourne’s emergency admissions, elective admissions, and first outpatient attendances over the last 12 years has been ranked in the middle.
  • Numbers of A&E attendances (which includes attendances at Urgent Treatment Centres and Minor Injury Units) for Eastbourne is around the middle compared to the other district and boroughs.

Chart 26 Number of emergency admissions, 12-year trends, for East Sussex districts/boroughs, 2011/12 – 2022/23

Chart 27 Number of elective admissions, 12-year trend for East Sussex districts/boroughs, 2011/12 – 2022/23

Chart 28 Number of first outpatient attendances, 12-year trend for East Sussex districts/boroughs, 2011/12 – 2022/23

Chart 29 Number of A&E attendances, East Sussex districts/boroughs, 2018/19 - 2022/23

Hospital activity - age specific rates & by deprivation

  • In terms of children and young people, rates of emergency admissions and outpatient and A&E attendances are highest in the under 5s and then drop for 5-9 years olds who tend to have the lowest rates across all age bands.
  • Rates are highest across all activity types in older people. For electives and outpatient attendances rates begin to decrease round the age of 80 years, which is generally not the case for urgent care.

Chart 30 Age-specific rates of emergency admissions, 2022/23

Chart 31 Age-specific rates of elective admissions, 2022/23

Chart 32 Age-specific rates of first outpatient attendances, 2022/23

Chart 33 Age-specific rates of A&E attendances, 2022/23

  • There is a clear association of higher emergency admissions with increasing levels of deprivation and a widening of the gap in admission rates between the most and least deprived areas. Historically this was the case with elective admissions and outpatient attendances, although in more recent years this has not necessarily been the case and in 2022/23 all areas experienced similar rates.
  • A&E attendance rates are highest in the most derived quintile followed by the second most deprived quintile, with the rest of East Sussex experiencing similar rates.

Chart 34 Age-standardised rates of emergency admissions by deprivation, 2011/12 – 2022/23

Chart 35 Age-standardised rates of elective admissions by deprivation, 2011/12 – 2022/23


Chart 36 Age-standardised rates of 1st outpatient attendances by deprivation, 2012/13 – 2022/23


Chart 37 Age-standardised rates of A&E attendances by deprivation, 2018/19 – 2022/23

Leading cause of admissions

  • There are differences in the main causes of emergency admissions by age group.
  • Respiratory conditions are the leading cause of emergency admissions in under 5s followed by infectious and parasitic diseases.
  • In children and young people aged 5-19 years and adults the leading cause of emergency admissions is signs, symptoms, and abnormal clinical/laboratory findings. 
Table 22 Eastbourne, 0-4 year olds (top 5 causes account for 81% of emergency admissions 2022, 2023)
Top 5 disease/injury causes of emergency admissions Number Percentage
Diseases of the respiratory system 326 38%
Certain infectious and parasitic diseases 141 16%
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified 132 15%
Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes 57 7%
Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period 40 5%
Total emergency admissoins for all causes 863  
Table 23 Eastbourne, 5-19 year olds (top 5 causes account for 76% of emergency admissions 2022, 2023)
Top 5 disease/injury causes of emergency admissions Number Percentage
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified 220 25%
Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes 158 18%
Diseases of the respiratory system 128 14%
Certain infectious and parasitic diseases 84 9%
Diseases of the digestive system 80 9%
Total emergency admissoins for all causes 886  
Table 24 Eastbourne, 20-64 year olds (top 5 causes account for 63% of emergency admissions 2022, 2023)
Top 5 disease/injury causes of emergency admissions Number Percentage
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified 965 22%
Diseases of the digestive system 522 12%
Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes 509 12%
Diseases of the respiratory system 418 10%
Diseases of the circulatory system 303 7%
Total emergency admissoins for all causes 4336  
Table 25 Eastbourne, 65+ year olds (top 5 causes account for 66% of emergency admissions 2022, 2023)
Top 5 disease/injury causes of emergency admissions Number Percentage
Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified 1021 16%
Diseases of the circulatory system 920 15%
Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes 899 15%
Diseases of the respiratory system 693 11%
Diseases of the digestive system 562 9%
Total emergency admissoins for all causes 6198  

Adult social care caseload

  • Eastbourne has a higher rate of new contacts with Adult Social Care for both adults (18-64) and older people (65+) age groups compared to East Sussex.

Chart 38 - Total number of new contacts as a rate per 100,000 population, 2021/22

  • Eastbourne has a lower percentage than East Sussex for older people (65+) and adults (18-64) for 'new care' contacts progressing to a Social Care Assessment.

Chart 39 - 'New care' contacts from the community that have progressed to a Social Care Assessment, 2021/22

  • Eastbourne has a similar percentage as East Sussex for Social Care Assessment that resulted in Support Plans.

Chart 40 - Social Care Assessment that resulted in Support Plans, 2021/22

  • Eastbourne has the second highest rate for adults and older people with at least one activity in a 12-month period compared to the other districts and boroughs. 

Chart 41 – Number of people with at least one activity in a 12-month period as a rate per 100,000 population, 2021/22

Activity relates to contacts, assessments, reviews, appearance of needs tools, other statutory work, and safeguarding episodes.

Note: East Sussex data also includes clients that were unable to be allocated to a specific district/borough.

  • Eastbourne has a similar rate to East Sussex for persons receiving Long Term Support during 2021-22 for adults and slightly higher for older people.

Chart 42 – Persons receiving Long Term Support per 1,000 population, 2021/22

CSC caseload / Looked after children

  • Eastbourne has the highest referrals to children’s social care with 53 per 1,000 children. Eastbourne has similar rates to East Sussex for looked after children and child protection plans.

Chart 43 Children's social care - Locked after Children, Child Protection plans rate per 1,000 as at 31st March 2023 and referrals, 2022/23