East Sussex COVID-19 Historic data

Introduction

This profile should be used to inform decisions and plans and to identify priorities to improve local people’s health and reduce health inequalities in East Sussex. The profile identifies needs (which may also be referred to or seen as deficits) as well as assets (which may also be referred to or seen as strengths) from key indicators that have been bench marked against the England average. Causes of premature mortality and inequalities in life expectancy are also presented. This profile forms part of the East Sussex Joint Strategic Needs and Assets Assessment (JSNAA) and draws together data and analysis from East Sussex public health reports and various health profiles produced by Public Health England. It brings together existing data and analysis, from a variety of sources, at Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), Primary Care Networks (PCNs), district/borough councils and East Sussex levels.


COVID-19

Clinically extremely vulnerable for COVID-19

One quarter of the East Sussex estimated clinically extremely vulnerable residents reside in Wealden.

People defined as clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) were classified as at greatest risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and were advised to shield by the government during the lockdown periods. People were identified as CEV if they had an underlying health condition and/or weak immune system, including: solid organ transplant recipients; specific cancers; severe respiratory conditions; people at significantly increased risk of infections; people on immunosuppression therapies; and women who are pregnant with significant heart disease. People were also added to the Shielded Patient List by a clinician or GP if deemed at higher risk of serious illness. The Clinical Vulnerable are classified as at increased risk of severe cases of COVID including: those aged over 70 years; those under 70 with an underlying health condition; and those who were pregnant

Cases

Chart 1 shows COVID cases over the 3 main waves in the pandemic. During the first wave Covid testing was targeted and so the number of actual cases in the population will have been higher than the data reported. Towards the end May 2020, wider testing was made available and this is reflected in the data reported from that period onwards.

  • The 7 day rolling rates followed the national pattern.
  • During the second wave, East Sussex district and boroughs case rates were higher than England, particularly in Hastings and Rother. At their peak, Hastings and Eastbourne had higher rates than England during the second wave.
  • During the third wave, case rates were higher than in earlier in the pandemic, likely to reflect the higher transmissibility of the Omicron variant.

Per the Office of National Statistics, Wave 1 is defined as the period between 23/03/2020 and 30/05/2020; Wave 2 is defined as the period between 07/09/2020 and 24/04/2021 and wave 3 is the period 26/05/2021 to the present.

Chart 1 COVID-19 7-day rolling case rates per 100,000 population, for East Sussex residents, February 2022

Chart 22 COVID-19 7-day rolling case rates per 100,000 population, for East Sussex residents , February 2022

The chart shows data up to, and including, 23rd of February 2022 when the government announced the end of the publication of the confirmed Covid cases.

Hospitalisations

Chart 2 shows the daily COVID cases in a hospital bed reported by East Sussex Hospital NHS Trust (ESHT), Brighton and Sussex University Hospital NHS Trust (BSUH), University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust (specifically just the data for Royal Sussex County, Princess Royal, Sussex Eye and Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospitals) and the Tunbridge Wells Hospital (TWH) which is part of Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust (MTW).

  • BSUH/UHS had the highest number of confirmed cases in a hospital bed during the first wave.
  • ESHT had a higher number of confirmed cases in a hospital bed in the second wave compared to BSUH and TWH, reporting almost 450 cases in hospital beds at its peak.
  • During the third wave there has been a lower number of cases in hospital beds, with no trust reporting more than 100 cases at any point.

Chart 2 Daily confirmed COVID cases in a hospital bed (ESHT, BSUH/UHS and TWH), February 2022

The chart shows the daily confirmed cases in a hospital bed (ESHT, BSUH/UHS & TWH)

BSUH merged with Western Sussex Hospitals Trust on 1st April to form University Hospitals Sussex NHS Foundation Trust (UHS) and so the data presented here is from both Trusts, but only covers Royal Sussex County, Princess Royal, Sussex Eye and Royal Alexandra Children’s Hospitals.

Deaths

  • Deaths have been highest in wave 2.
  • Analysis has shown that in East Sussex:
    • wave 3 deaths are slightly more male and younger than previous waves
    • In wave 1 92% of covid-19 deaths were due to COVID-19 (underlying cause), with this decreasing with the subsequent waves
    • Wave 3 had fewer other mentions of dementia on the death certificate, but slightly more mentions of chronic kidney disease and COPD
    • Overall in wave 3 deaths there were more co-morbidities recorded on the death certificate (in 99% of deaths) compared to the previous waves (95% of deaths)

Chart 3 Daily COVID-19 deaths, East Sussex residents (any mention on the death certificate), deaths registered to 31st March 2022

Chart 24 Daily COVID-19 deaths, East Sussex residents (any mention on the death certificate), deaths registered to 31st March 2022

Vaccinations

  • East Sussex has a higher percentage (68%) of the people aged 12 and over receiving a 3rd dose or booster, compared to England (58%).
  • The districts and boroughs with the older age profiles have the highest percentage of people receiving a 3rd dose/booster of COVID-19 vaccines, and Hasting has the lowest.

Chart 4 People aged 12 and over who have received a dose of COVID-19 vaccine, February 2022

Chart 25 People aged 12 and over who have received a dose of COVID-19 vaccine , February 2022

The data is for the period up to 23rd of February 2022.